Marvel Cinematic Universe-Phase Three

Marvel Cinematic Universe-Phase Three

THOR: RAGNAROK (2017)


Director: Taika Waititi
Starring: Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Cate Blanchett, Mark Ruffalo, Anthony Hopkins, Jeff Goldblum, Tessa Thompson, Idris Elba, Karl Urban

Chris Hemsworth will forever be known as Thor, the god of thunder. Thor: Ragnarok is his third solo entry in the franchise on top of the two Avengers ensemble movies. He knows how to use his charm and mighty strength to get himself out of any situation. He manages to escape from the fire demon Surfur and learns his father Odin (Hopkins) is no longer on their home planet of Asgard. Brother Loki (Hiddleston) has banished him to New York City, but when they arrive they find out he’s no longer there. With a little help from a friend (no spoilers!), they are sent to Norway where they’re finally reunited with their father who is nearing his final days. Odin reveals they have a long-lost sister, Hela, who is hell bent on revenge. With Cate Blanchett sporting a fierce black suit and a horn-filled helmet, you know she means business. The film’s title “Ragnarok” refers to the fall of Asgard. Hela is the goddess of death and the rightful heir to the throne. She’s not one to be messed with, as Asgard isn’t her only goal. She can take down full armies hoping to rule over every realm in the universe. It’s not an easy trip back to Asgard for Thor who finds himself stuck on the planet Sakaar. He is unwillingly thrust into the ring as the latest opponent to take on the reigning champion of an arena-style fight. That champion is his good old buddy, The Incredible Hulk (Ruffalo). Once Thor and Hulk manage to make their way out of Sakaar, it’s a race against time for them to stop Hela before she destroys Asgard.

Thor has previously been the beefy serious Avenger, but in this film, we get the playful more comedic side of the character. Don’t worry; he’s still as beefy as ever. His trusty hammer and flowing locks are long gone, so he’s left scrambling to find some new tactics. The overall tone falls more in line with the Guardians of the Galaxy movies than the other Thor or Avengers movies. The film is practically all CGI exploding with colors, textures, creatures of all shapes and sizes, and cosmic sorcery all set in a very techno inspired world thanks to the score by Mark Mothersbaugh. Even with a villain as wicked as Hela, it’s rarely doom and gloom–a stark contrast to what their rival DC is doing with their superhero universe.

Actor/director Taika Waititi, best known for the vampire mockumentary What We Do in the Shadows, brings that very self-aware tone to the forefront. As a whole, the writing team doesn’t seem all that concerned with advancing the Marvel Cinematic Universe in a plot sense. Sure, there are mentions of the Infinity Stones and the last Avengers movie, but it’s all in passing. Ragnarok is a kick butt, joyous side movie that will easily please the fans. The comedy is ever present with very cheeky dialogue and physical comedy gags, particularly in the gladiator scenes between Thor and Hulk. There are jokes about wearing Tony Stark’s tight pants and what the Hulk looks like naked. It’s total buffoonery and makes no apologies for it.

Marvel has never skimped when it comes to finding just the right cast for their heroes and villains. Chris Hemsworth has proven before he can handle comedy with his role in Ghostbusters and stints hosting Saturday Night Live. Here he gets to flex those chops in almost every scene he gets. Mark Ruffalo also gets to have more fun as the Hulk. Once he returns into Bruce Banner’s body, we get to see a more confused side of Banner, but one that comes with this childlike wonder that hasn’t been explored in past. Those returning to the franchise include: Tom Hiddleston as Loki, one of the best Marvel villains to date, Anthony Hopkins’ Odin, and Idris Elba as Heimdall, the hidden hero of Asgard.

Giving them all a run for their money are the new players, especially Cate Blanchett. The two-time Oscar winner (The Aviator, Blue Jasmine) is wickedly good, as she always is, as the film’s token villain. You can tell Blanchett is having the time of her life as she can let loose and play into the over-the-top villain angle. Jeff Goldblum takes on the role of Grandmaster who is in charge of the planet Sakaar. Goldblum is one of the few actors I can think of that can play a parody of himself and have it work in every movie. He adds a bit more flamboyance to the Grandmaster than in other roles, and you just want more of him throughout. Tessa Thompson (Creed) is another great addition to the cast as the bounty hunter Valkyrie.

Marvel has kept some of their recent films like Spider-Man: Homecoming and Captain America: Civil War grounded on Earth where the stakes are a bit more tangible. I tend to gravitate toward those films a bit more if I were to rank the Marvel movies. That’s not to say that Taika Waititi’s approach to Thor: Ragnarok should not be applauded. Sure, the plot is fairly simplistic but he went all out it taking a character in the complete opposite direction. It’s a necessary step if you going to continue cranking these movies out. Ragnarok is all dazzle and charm with a winning cast whose energy radiates onto the audience in a Hulk-size way.

Is It Worth Your Trip to the Movies? Marvel’s comedic approach to Thor delivers on all accounts

RATING: 4 out of 5 TICKET STUBS

 

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (2017)


Director: Jon Watts
Starring: Tom Holland, Michael Keaton, Robert Downey Jr., Marisa Tomei, Jon Favreau, Zendaya, Donald Glover, Jacob Batalon, Tony Revolori, Tyne Daly, Abraham Attah, Hannibal Buress

If you think three different iterations of Spider-Man within a ten-year period were too many, you may be right. I present to you Spider-Man: Homecoming, which may change your mind a bit after the disappointing Amazing Spider-Man movies. We were first introduced to actor Tom Holland as Peter Parker/Spider-Man last year in Captain America: Civil War. Homecoming opens in the aftermath of the first Avengers movie with Michael Keaton’s Adrian Toomes collecting various alien debris that was left in the path of destruction. Eight years pass and we see him having fully constructed a variety of weapons powerful enough to cause serious harm to the city. He’s also created a suit for himself giving him the ability to fly. As his alter ego Vulture, he’s the token villain this time around.

The present day scenes are in the days following the confrontation in Civil War. There’s a fun scene where Peter is watching a video he shot of that big fight. It’s all very meta and self-aware. That’s one of the tonal differences you’ll find with this Spider-Man versus the others. Tom Holland looks more like the high schooler he’s actually playing unlike Tobey Maguire or Andrew Garfield. Peter is itching to become an official Avenger and has been working undercover with Tony Stark as part of the Stark “internship program.” At school, he’s a complete nerd often getting picked on as part of the school’s quiz bowl team. He’s determined to keep his other identity a secret, and it’s even worse when best friend Ned (Batalon) finds out that he’s Spider-Man. When Vulture’s weapons start appearing on the black market, Peter gets a little too carried away with his newfound abilities and desire to protect the citizens of New York.

You may be asking yourself why we’re seeing a third Spider-Man. There’s a lot of behind-the-scenes legal shenanigans that had to happen as the character was owned by Sony despite Disney owning Marvel. Marvel president Kevin Feige had to pull some legal strings to get the character back to where he belonged. It should be noted that while this is the first full-length movie we’ve seen with Tom Holland as Peter Parker, this is not an origins story. The audience is well aware by now that a radioactive spider bit Peter, so the writers know they can save time and skip over rehashing that part of the story.

I was bit cautious as I didn’t think there was a need for more Spidey movies, but Homecoming has changed my mind. Marvel is continuing to cross genre lines as they did with Guardians of the Galaxy and Deadpool. We may think of these movies as action-filled superhero movies, but Marvel continues to pump as much comedy in them as possible. This take on Spider-Man is vastly different than the other two series. The six member writing team and director Jon Watts have used the old John Hughes comedies from the 1980s as their guide. Many of the film’s scenes are set within the walls of Peter Parker’s high school. The execution of the high school life feels tangible and realistic. Homecoming aptly brings a welcome diversity its cast of characters, which would be found in this kind of high school. We see some of Peter’s friends prepping for the homecoming dance and there’s talk of whom Peter will take as his date. This is also extended to one of the major action scenes taking place at the quiz bowl competition location.

Due to the extremely youthful presence of the film’s setting, one could see this as Marvel-lite. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. It still feels like a Marvel movie, but it’s by far the most kid-friendly we’ve seen from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Tom Holland brings an energetic vibe to Peter. Sometimes the character’s been too morose in the past dealing with the death of Uncle Ben. That’s another storyline that has been sidestepped in this movie. Holland’s Peter is just so excited about saving the day and becoming an official Avenger. Many kids will be able to relate to what he brings to the character. Going toe-to-toe with Holland is Michael Keaton as Vulture. He’s practically done a 180 in his career as he gained notoriety for playing the hero in Batman, and in Birdman he played an actor who once played a superhero. Keaton brings his lavish and erratic style to Vulture in that quintessential Keaton way that we have come to love and respect him for. Vulture’s a great villain, and Keaton makes him one of the best we’ve seen in a Spider-Man movie. The rest of the cast includes a delightfully oblivious Aunt May (Tomei), Robert Downey Jr’s Tony Stark, and Jon Favreau as Stark’s main guy Happy who has to be in charge of Peter Parker.

It’s refreshing to see an age-appropriate actor like Tom Holland play Peter. There’s an attitude toward Peter when he’s told “You’re too young to understand.” It takes him some time to realize that there’s more to being a hero than wearing a suit. These scenes between Tony and Peter and the connection between Peter and his friends give the film heart. Director Jon Watts is better with these moments than action sequences, which feel a bit sloppy and poorly constructed compared to others we’ve seen from Marvel. The studio likes to take chances on aspiring directors, and this is Watts’ largest film to date. Homecoming may not be my favorite from Marvel, but Holland has made a lasting impression as the character. He’ll be a great addition to the upcoming Avengers movies.

Is It Worth Your Trip to the Movies? Tom Holland makes this a surprisingly welcome return to the world of Spidey.

RATING: 4 out of 5 TICKET STUBS

 

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2 (2017)


Writer/Director: James Gunn
Starring: Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Bradley Cooper, Vin Diesel, Kurt Russell, Michael Rooker, Karen Gillan, Pom Klementieff, Elizabeth Debicki, Chris Sullivan, Sean Gunn

In 2014, Marvel took a chance at a fairly unknown series in their canon named Guardians of the Galaxy and unleashed it as part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It felt fresh and exciting for the superhero genre and made star Chris Pratt a bona fide action star. Three years later, the sequel is here to make fans laugh all over again. Chris Pratt leads our group of Guardians as Peter Quill/Star-Lord alongside Gamora (Saldana), Drax the Destroyer (Bautista), feisty Rocket (Cooper), and the adorable little tree Groot (Diesel) who are fighting off a gigantic slug with razor sharp teeth on the planet of Sovereign. Despite killing the slug they find themselves in quite the bind with High Priestess Ayesha (Debicki) on a planet where everything and everyone is gold. Gamora is confronted with her sister Nebula (Gillan) who has a bounty placed upon her on another planet. There is no love lost between the sisters. Meanwhile, Rocket steals some coveted batteries on the planet sending Ayesha off attacking the Guardians as they try to flee. The Guardians crash land on another planet barely escaping Ayesha’s warriors. They’ve also been followed by another ship through this portal. The pilot of this mysterious vessel is Ego (Russell), Peter’s father whom he hasn’t seen since childhood. His guard is up and not ready to trust his father who left his mother many years ago. The question remains as to why Ego has taken it upon himself to find Peter all of a sudden. I could go with divulging more about the various plotlines involved in Vol. 2, but I don’t want to overly complicate things that could wind up being spoilers.

Within the film’s first opening moments, writer and director James Gunn, who also conceived the first film, reminds the audience why the Marvel Cinematic Universe sets itself apart from the DC movies. I sat back with a big grin and chuckled along with the bickering among Peter and his crew. Gunn then takes time to shift the action a bit by focusing in on little Baby Groot who is off dancing to his own rhythm when there is a big monster right behind him. To compliment his cuteness is Bradley Cooper voicing Rocket who is full of attitude and opinions. Cooper is so memorable and dynamic as Rocket that I’m still contemplating if this is his best role to date. Is that fair given it’s an animated hero versus his edgier work with David O. Russell or Clint Eastwood?

Marvel has done well by making their sequels work just as well, if not better, than their predecessors. Once we move past the introductory stories, we can start having more fun and experiment with the characters. That’s precisely what Gunn has done as you can tell by that opening scene. He has written a witty and playful sense of humor with nearly every major character given their time to shine with a snappy comeback or retort back to their adversary. The script is also chock full of pop culture references throughout including bits about Cheers, Mary Poppins, and David Hasselhoff. Back again is the catchy rock music that fills the soundtrack as Peter turns on his cassette of “Awesome Mix 2” for inspiration.

Like most sequels, everything is bigger and more lavish in Vol. 2. I often lament about the overreliance on CGI and special effects when practical sets and effects could be utilized. This is that rare example where they were used exceptionally well to the point where I was never distracted by it. The costumes, make-up, and production design are exploding with color and texture in every frame. They fit right in with the galactic tone without looking cartoony. There are plenty of dynamic action sequences yet none of them felt like they were dragged out for too long like we’ve seen in some of the Marvel or DC movies. James Gunn raises the stakes for our heroes by making them reaffirm what the idea of family means to them. Peter’s reunion with Ego is front and center as well as his relationship with the paternal Yondu (Rooker), while Gamora and Nebula test their definition of sisterhood. In a broader sense, the Guardians have a family unit among themselves and are constantly reminded that, despite their differences, they are an unbreakable force when united for the common good.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is another highly entertaining outing for Marvel. James Gunn is fully aware of the story and world they have created and have fun with it. It sets out to be an entertaining ride that never takes itself too seriously. It starts to feel a bit long and stretched out in the middle due to the various plotlines which has our team separated but regains its momentum once a big character reveal occurs. It’s great to be back with these characters again, especially scene-stealers Rocket and Baby Groot. Rocket’s wiseass cracks yield some of the biggest laughs, and it’s hard not to adore the cuteness overload in the animation given to Baby Groot and Vin Diesel’s various intonations of “I am Groot!” Kurt Russell is a great addition to the cast as he easily dips into his ultra-cool persona as Ego. He’s having a highly successful year thanks to this and starring in The Fate of the Furious. Make sure to stay through all of the credits, as there are five post-credit sequences and the announcement that “The Guardians will return.”

Is It Worth Your Trip to the Movies? Will no doubt please fans, but also those growing tired of the genre

RATING: 4 out of 5 TICKET STUBS

 

CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR (2016)


Director: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo
Starring: Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr, Scarlett Johansson, Sebastian Stan, Anthony Mackie, Elizabeth Olsen, Don Cheadle, Jeremy Renner, Chadwick Boseman, Paul Rudd, Daniel Brühl, Tom Holland

This is the thirteenth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The number 13 is typically an unlucky number for some, yet Marvel is in top form with its third Captain America film. With so many characters it may seem like the next Avengers film, but Captain America/Steve Rogers (Evans) and the relationship he has with best friend Bucky Barnes (Stan) is front and center. Bucky’s known as The Winter Solider and has been on the run following the events of the previous film, The Winter Soldier. He is believed to be the man responsible for an explosion at the United Nations headquarters in Vienna killing the Nigerian leader. Steve knows that Bucky wasn’t behind the explosion and seeks to find him before the authorities catch him. The man behind the explosion is Captain Helmut Zemo (Brühl) who’s after secret HYDRA reports from a December 1991 mission involving Bucky.

This isn’t the only problem plaguing Steve; the Avengers are starting to unhinge after witnessing and realizing their actions and attempts at saving the world come with a cost. Many innocent lives have been taken and an incident in Lagos, Nigeria left a shattering death toll. This all leads to the creation of the Sokovian Accords. If this passes, it would mean that the Avengers are no longer a private organization. The government would step in and control them. This concept drives a sharp divide between Captain America, Iron Man/Tony Stark (Downey) and the rest of the Avengers.

For those following along closely at home, we have now entered Phase 3 of Marvel’s Cinematic Universe. Marvel continues to make smart choices with the direction of their franchises. The Winter Soldier has been lauded as one of the best in the franchise, so it was a wise move for producer Kevin Feige to keep that creative team in place with directors Joe and Anthony Russo and writers Stephen McFeely and Christopher Marcus. As I think back on the entire Marvel canon, the Captain America entries have been the strongest and most consistent as they continue to evolve and raise the stakes for our central characters. You can’t just keep making the same “good guys vs. villain” film over and over or else they start to all feel the same. To a certain extent we have that here with Daniel Brühl in the villain role. The real conflict and heart of the movie falls with Steve’s relationship with Bucky and the core group of Avengers. Like many long-lasting friendships, there are times when you realize you vehemently disagree on a position. The film tackles that very concept and it’s a sharp move to ask the audience to take on that journey of how we act when we’re wrong but think we’re right. There’s an impactful image of each side lining up as if they are in a shootout at the O.K. Corral.

A majority of the fan favorite characters are back with the exception of Thor and the Hulk. Steve continues to play the role of loyal friend to Bucky as that’s the one friendship he can’t let go of from his past. It’s easier for him to turn against Tony. This is Robert Downey Jr.’s sixth film playing Tony, and we’re starting to see a very different side to the character. He’s worn down, exhausted, and no longer the hotshot playboy that we’re used to from previous films. He’s really starting to feel the ramifications of what Iron Man has done to his personal life with Pepper Potts and the lives that have been taken due to the Avengers.

Civil War also acts as the introduction to new heroes who will be getting future movies in Phase 3. Chadwick Boseman (42, Get on Up) is donning the claws as T’Challa/Black Panther. T’Challa’s father is the Nigerian leader who is killed in the U.N. attacks. It’s a relief to feel like he is given a proper arch in the film with a true conflict at hand against Bucky. The other noteworthy appearance is that of Peter Parker/Spider-Man. There had been some studio disputes involving the rights to the character who was previously played by Tobey Maguire and Andrew Garfield. While it seems redundant to have yet another Spider-Man, Kevin Feige is taking a new spin on the character by reminding the audience he is actually a high school kid. This time he’s played with a spritely sense of humor by newcomer Tom Holland with Marisa Tomei popping up as lovable Aunt May. For those who were hesitant or feared he was a one-scene cameo, he is given more to do than what’s been shown in the trailers.

This film clocks in at being the Marvel film with the longest runtime at 146 minutes. In case you hadn’t noticed yet, the film has a lot of ground to cover with the multiple storylines and characters. It all coalesces together well without feeling gimmicky or a ploy to add unnecessary characters which I was originally afraid of with all of the hype surrounding the film. This can easily happen when screenwriters try to bite off more than they can chew, but I never felt lost or confused by their choices. The pace is kept up and never drags, as the action sequences are swift yet controlled in how they are edited together. I never felt like any of them suffered from being too long, which plagued Avengers: Age of Ultron and many other superhero films like DC Comics’ Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.

I’m drawn to the superhero movies that feel like they have plausible stakes at hand. I am far more invested when the emotion and conflict is grounded in reality. Yes, you can have fun with a man who can shrink down in size, use a deadly shield, or fly around in an iron suit, but finding the proper balance is key. Directors Joe and Anthony Russo have masterfully crafted their film and found that balance. Despite the serious tones and heavy weight put on Steve Rogers and Tony Stark, there is still so much humor in the film thanks to the witty script and comedic entries of Paul Rudd as Ant-Man and Tom Holland as Spider-Man. It’s a globe-trotting spectacle which fully utilizes every Avenger, side hero, and villain along the way. Just when you thought you might need a break from the superhero genre, it pulls you back in again. I need to find time in my calendar to see it a second time.

Is It Worth Your Trip to the Movies? It’s the best Marvel film in years.

RATING: 4 out of 5 TICKET STUBS

 

DOCTOR STRANGE (2016)

Director: Scott Derrickson
Starring: Benedict Cumberbatch, Rachel McAdams, Tilda Swinton, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Mads Mikkelsen, Michael Stuhlbarg, Benjamin Bratt, Benedict Wong

Benedict Cumberbatch is no stranger at playing characters with super egos as that is how he interprets Sherlock Holmes. He brings a similar quality to Doctor Stephen Strange. He’s a neurosurgeon in the top of his field. He’s massively rich, a music savant, and probably smarter than his own good allows. His colleague Dr. Christine Palmer (McAdams) happens to be a former flame, and there is still a spark between them. On a stormy night he cruises along a curvy road headed to dinner with the elite where he is to make a presentation. He gets a work call about a potential procedure with accompanying scans to view on his phone. It’s that split second he took his eyes off the road that forever changed his life. I hope all the teen drivers out there are paying attention. His loses control and his precious sports car veers off the cliff. The horrendous accident results in massive surgeries on his arms and hands rendering him unable to work. That is his whole life and now he’s lost it.

When he comes to the realization that no other experimental surgeries will fix the nerves in his hands, he heads to Nepal to seek out a mystic healer who has been known to work miracles. There he meets the Ancient One (Swinton) who opens his mind to the concept of reorienting our spirit to better heal our body. He adapts to the practice at lightning speed as he harnesses energy to cast spells and magic. What he doesn’t know until it’s too late is that the Ancient One has chosen him to go after Kaecilius (Mikkelson), a former master who has now switched to the dark side. Any further explanation of this rabbit hole would over complicate things.

I went into Doctor Strange without any knowledge about the comics. Then again, I basically go into every Marvel movie like that when they start introducing a new character. Marvel Studios has anchored their films with the likes of Iron Man, Captain America and the rest of the Avengers, and now they’re breaking into their deeper cuts with stories and characters that may be new for many people. Like Guardians of the Galaxy, we’re reaching further into the obscure. Strange can be viewed without any previous knowledge of the Marvel Universe, as there are no direct tie-ins to other characters or story lines. There’s no mention of S.H.I.E.L.D, Hydra, Loki, or any member of the Stark family. Marvel knew that this film wouldn’t work early on in their foray into big screen adventures as you have to be willing to go on a very “experimental” type of journey with these characters. They trust that if you enjoyed a wise-cracking raccoon and a talking tree in Guardians, you can settle in for the mystic arts and viewpoints presented here.

One thing you’ll notice right away is that it stands apart from many of their other films in its approach all the while keeping it on brand for Marvel. It’s very sci-fi and fantasy based with an Inception meets Harry Potter tone. I had feared it would follow the typical origins type story about some arrogant man getting used to a new suit and powers thanks to advancements in technology. Okay, so maybe that premise is here but only to an extent. There are no mad scientists or bugs. It fully acknowledges that it doesn’t try to live in the reality of present day. There’s a paradox at hand as it tackles a variety of philosophical questions about how we see life, ancient healing, surrendering your ego, and the consequences of trying to break the natural order but it throws in opening time portals, shifting dimensions, and Doctor Strange’s new magical cloak. It’s also worth noting that it appears to be one of the most special effects heavy Marvel films due to how the imagery constantly bends and manipulates on itself. It’s a bizarre mix of colors and shapes as if you were looking into a kaleidoscope. Don’t worry, you shouldn’t get sick with the 3D but it provides a drug trip for the eyes.

Like the others in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, casting is spot on. Benedict Cumberbatch wears the surgical gloves and cape with ease making him feel perfectly in tune with the character. It’s fun to see him as this egocentric fellow and the humor that comes from him exploring this new world. Only ardent readers of the comics will know how well he fits that version of the character. Having Tilda Swinton (Snowpiercer, Michael Clayton) as the Ancient One is a risky casting choice due to the way the character is written in the comics, but Swinton handles it the only way she knows how to by bringing her quintessential avant-garde style to the Ancient One. A big blockbuster franchise doesn’t seem like the kind of project she would go for, but I’m ecstatic she went for it. She’s often accompanied by Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave) as Mordo. He’s one of her students learning the mystic arts and feels a bit in competition when Strange starts to excel at a faster pace. I’ve been a big fan of Rachel McAdams for years, and she’s another natural fit as Doctor Strange’s former love who finds herself thrust in this new idea of portals and dimensions. What would a Marvel movie be without its token villain? That belongs to resident antagonist Mads Mikkelson who has previously ruffled feathers as the bad guy in Casino Royale and the television version of Hannibal.

Doctor Strange follows in the line of having a relatively unknown director in charge. Scott Derrickson primarily has a horror background with the likes of The Exorcism of Emily Rose, Sinister, and Deliver Us from Evil. This is by far his biggest project, and he does a fine job of keeping Doctor Strange fun and exciting even if it’s a little bit “out there”. He has aptly brought forth the Marvel sense of humor that reminds us why these movies set themselves a part from the DC Comics movies. Many Marvel movies leave me wanting more. Not necessarily from that movie I came out of, but knowing that they’ve set up a great foundation and I’m looking forward to what’s going to come next. Mr. Cumberbatch will likely appear in the next Thor film and Avengers: Infinity War. Don’t get up too soon once the credits start as there are two post-credit sequences.

Is It Worth Your Trip to the Movies? Probably not for a Marvel newbie, but it will surely please the fans.

RATING: 4 out of 5 TICKET STUBS